Alastair Borthwick Managed To Perfectly Capture A Specific Moment In Scotland

A respected broadcaster, author and also a journalist, Alastair Borthwick was the man behind two classic books. He was born in 1913 and died in 2003 and is the author of the beloved books Always a Little Further and Sans Peur. Alastair Borthwick hailed originally from the Scottish town of Rutherglen and also spent a significant portion of his childhood in both Glasgow and Troon. At the age of only sixteen, he began to work for the Glasgow Herald. He worked his way through the ranks at the paper and eventually gained editorial duties. He became known for writing engaging articles on the topics of the working class and also the Scottish hillwalking scene.

The success that Alastair Borthwick enjoyed while working for the Glasgow Herald led to his hiring by London’s Daily Mirror. This was a huge step up in the journalistic ranks for Alastair Borthwick but he never really took to the London scene. Not long after taking up this position he returned to Glasgow to work for the BBC. During this period of time, he worked as a radio correspondent.

1939 was a landmark year for Alastair Borthwick as he published his first book titled Always a Little Further. In this work, he compiled a large number of the work that he had produced during his time at the Herald. Though the books publishing company was initially unsure about the nature of the work, a bit of convincing from T.S. Eliot made the difference and the work went on to be one of the best of its kind ever written. His second book Sans Peur was perhaps even more personal to Alastair Borthwick as it was a history of the very World War II battalion, the Fifth Battalion, known as the Seaforth Highlanders, that Alastair had served with. You can read more about Alastair by going to undiscoveredscotland.co.uk.

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